Mark Cane

Founder, M.A. Program in Climate and Society; G. Unger Vetlesen Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University

Mark Cane

Cane received his Ph.D. in meteorology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975. Currently, he is chief physical scientist at the IRI and serves on the IRI’s International Science and Technical Advisory Committee. With Lamont colleague Stephen Zebiak, Cane devised the first numerical model able to simulate El Niño. In 1985 this model was used to make the first physically based forecasts of El Niño. He has also worked extensively on the impact of El Niño on human activity, especially agriculture. His efforts over many years were instrumental in the creation of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. Cane’s recent research interests include paleoclimate problems from the Pliocene to the last millennium, as well as future climate change. Cane has written some 200 papers on a broad range of topics in oceanography and climatology. In 1992 Cane received the Sverdrup Gold Medal of the American Meteorological Society, and in 2003 he received the Cody Award in Ocean Sciences from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society; the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Geophysical Union, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.