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Will I Be Jobless December 31, 2016?

by | August 2, 2015
Category: Student Voices
Blogs_RutgersSolarParking

A solar tax credit is expected to expire late next year. Will it spell the end of the solar industry?

Ethiopia Reacts to ENACTS: How Climate Services Were Received in Lucy’s Birthplace

by | August 2, 2015
Category: Student Voices
Examples of ENACTS Maproom tools driven by climate data from Ethiopia. Credit: IRI Data Library

When I started my work at IRI, I had no idea what ENACTS was, how it was related to Ethiopia or how climate was related to health. That was in December 2014. But I quickly learned about it and by July 2015, I found myself riddled with vaccines and leading meetings in Ethiopia on how ENACTS and climate services could aid in decision-making and strategies for malaria elimination.

A Landfill Gets a Second Life

by | July 27, 2015
Category: Student Voices
On top of Section 3/4, a fully converted park mound, at Fresh Kills Park with  the Manhattan skyline in the background. Credits: Apoorva Mathur

As a part of my internship, I went on a field trip to the Staten Island Transfer Station (SITS), one of the most notorious landfills in the country. As soon as we entered the area, I thought I would be hit by a wall of overwhelming garbage smell, but much to my surprise, it smelled like grass and flowers except for when we entered the building where the garbage is dropped off.

The Most Interesting Story of All: When Nothing Happens

by | July 27, 2015
Category: Student Voices
NairobiSlums

Learning about what makes it so that a flash flood of equal magnitude in Brooklyn only inconvenienced some people, and yet similar floods in Nairobi, Kenya last month led to property damage and loss of life is vital to understanding what coping mechanisms are effective.

Conservation in New York City: Focusing Less on the Concrete and More on the “Jungle”

by | July 26, 2015
Category: Student Voices
My SCA community conservation crew visiting the High Line in New York City during an Environmental Education Day to learn about the importance of urban ecosystems. Credit: Mollie McGinnis

When we think of a natural ecosystem, our minds immediately wander to tall prospering trees, clean flowing water and the plentiful flora and fauna that makes each of these ecosystems unique. But that’s not all there is to it.

New Cyanotoxins Surface in Polar Region

by | July 24, 2015
Category: Student Voices
Scientists found that cyanobacteria live in hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. They convert nitrogen gas to nitrogenous compounds after sunset for their cell growth. Credit: Kyla Duhamel/Flickr

Death by cyanobacteria-made microtoxins is not pleasant. The toxins could damage the nervous system, especially anatoxin-a, also known as a Very Fast Death Factor. As the global temperature increases, concerns about the range of these toxins are growing.

Tracking Forests from Space

by | July 21, 2015
Category: Student Voices
Credit: Global Forest Watch

What can you see from space? Ed Lu, the science officer from Expedition Seven aboard the International Space Station, states that people can see an awful lot from space: ocean, desert, forest, glaciers, ; even things as small as a road, harbor and ships. And with rapid development of better sensors and remote sensing techniques, people have access to ever more information through the remote sensing images including monitoring forests. Today, scientists are developing an index to assess the healthiness, density and size of forests in Indonesia.

Knights at Night: A Zero-Carbon Ride in the City

by | July 20, 2015
Category: Student Voices
The starting point of the Moonlight Ride at Columbus Circle.  Credit: Kuntian Yu

On a late night bike ride through Central Park, With street noise shielded by dense tree patches and distant city lights shimmering through, it feels like you have retreated from the roaring streets but are not totally cut off from the prosperous and glamorous urban life. You can enjoy the tranquility of country life even while the amenities of New York are within reachable distance. Spinning by lakes, hillocks and bridges at a mild pace, there is nothing unsafe to worry about — except dodging the horse-drawn carriages that occasionally roll by.

Re-conceptualizing Adult Learning for a Changing World

by | July 19, 2015
Category: Student Voices
The most boring version of adult learning. Credit: Wikipedia

One of the most memorable characters from the cartoon series Charlie Brown is the faceless and prosaic teacher. Even though this character had no physical manifestation — no form, no dialogue — the caricature is memorable because of the frustration and giddiness it caused you to feel. No matter how eventful Charlie Brown’s day may have been, when he arrived at school, the teacher would motor on “wah-wah-wah-wah-wah,” inspiring the students to mutter to each other, “Are you getting anything of this?” Well, in a lot of adult learning situations, don’t you feel the same way?

How Being a Climate Researcher is Like Being a Kid

by | July 19, 2015
Category: Student Voices
Mountains in Ethiopia's highlands. Credit: Ethiopian Highlands/Flickr

When you were young, your family and teachers sought to teach you many things. They showed you how to tie your shoes and told you touching a hot stove will burn your finger. And like a good kid, you listened obediently without question, right?