Research

Sea-Level Rise and Louisiana’s Coastal Wetlands

by |March 18th, 2017

The effects of anthropogenic climate change – specifically sea-level rise due to ice melt and thermal expansion – are likely to threaten already vulnerable coastal wetlands in Louisiana according to a new study published in Nature Communications on Tuesday. The study was conducted by Climate and Society 2010 alum Krista L. Jankowski and colleagues at… read more

Creating an Ocean Eddy Map to Understand Global Climate Change from a Statistical Perspective

by |September 28th, 2016

Mesoscale eddies, known as the weather of the ocean, are masses of spinning water. The radical scale of an eddy ranges from 15 miles to more than 150 miles wide, with a lifetime of 10–100 days. Eddies are present almost everywhere in the world ocean, transporting heat, salt- and freshwater, dissolved carbon dioxide, and other tracers all around the globe.

Building Evidence to Meet the Heat Challenge

by |August 17th, 2016

Each month in 2016 continues to break global temperature records. As the impacts of climate change become clearer, public health officials, scientists, and policy makers around the world are scrambling to keep up with the impacts of a warming planet. The health hazards associated with changing weather and climate patterns are significant and varied.

An Unexpected Friendship with Numbers, and Why They Aren’t So Boring After All

by |August 3rd, 2016

Data is such an elemental component of any science, and atmospheric and climate science are certainly not exceptions. Data allows us to test hypotheses, to document the world around us, and quantify observations. Data is what allows us to say the planet is unequivocally warming, or that it rained 1 inch in Central Park last night or that yes, a certain percentage of U.S. voters actually do support Donald Trump.

Categories: Student Voices

Climate Change and the Syrian Conflict

by |March 3rd, 2015

The growing body of climate and conflict literature just got a major new study courtesy of C+S alum Colin Kelley (C+S ’08). The research, published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, looks how climate change influenced the ongoing Syrian conflict that’s given rise to the Islamic State.